Evangelical Morphodoxy

I have noticed a trend over recent days when engaging with the Christian blogosphere; it seems that some quarters find it all too easy to shout heretic at even the slightest questioning of any given evangelical construct. This is nothing new of course; the 'H' word has been used in all kinds of situation to silence dissenting voices so that those in power might feel safe in their chosen sphere of comfort. Thankfully nowadays we are more likely to be roasted on the Internet than burnt at the stake. It seems that some are afraid of the very idea of questioning current interpretations of orthodoxy, as if God might be offended by our need to understand. To a watching world it must make the creator of the universe look a little insecure if he has left the task of his honour being defended to the likes of us. Surely questioning is as much a part of the faith journey as any other spiritual discipline and yet you will be hard pushed to find it encouraged in some sections of the church. I can do nothing but take my lead from the incarnation; this moment when God took the ultimate risk of becoming human. In this act we see how full commitment to the idea of 'becoming' can have eternal consequences. It seems plain to me that the church, as Christ's body, should have the same desire to 'become' what it needs to be in every generation and to every tribe. The very notion that the church should look exactly the same in every context seems to ignore the Incarnational motif. By definition there needs to be difference: there needs to be change. For this to happen questions need to be asked. At times the kind of questions that risk the use of the 'H' word. The search for orthodoxy is perhaps subservient to the need for evangelical Morphodoxy.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Alan,long time no speak... are you concerned with orthodoxy or orthopraxy? it seems 2 frustrations in one in the blog?? anyway - i am not sure we really know what orthodoxy is, other than what our ancestors have taught as their interpretation of a book that is (by their own admission "alive"). my sole contribution to such things is to ask awkward questions such as "are we saved by grace or by someone elses understanding of faith?" and then get stares from bible college lecturers. well that was therapeutic...

Anonymous said...

this is David Ford by the way - had no idea i would come up as anonymous (perhaps best if i had left it)

Alan Molineaux said...

Hi David

It gets complicated because the call for heresy is aimed at both belief and practice.

My concern is that we are not allowed to ask questions in either sphere

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the blog post. Jones and I have been saving for a new e-book on this issue and your blog post has made all of us to save money. Your thoughts really answered all our issues. In fact, more than what we had thought of prior to when we came across your great blog. I no longer have doubts including a troubled mind because you have really attended to our own needs in this post. Thanks

Alan Molineaux said...

Hi. Thanks for your very kind comment.

Do we follow each other on twitter.
If so what is your twitter name.

Thanks Al

Nichelle Lamb said...

Hi David It gets complicated because the call for heresy is aimed at both belief and practice. My concern is that we are not allowed to ask questions in either sphere